Singapore Contemporary Young Artists

Playing With & For The Community

Connected//Contacted


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The opening night of Connected//Contacted was a great success! Many of our attendees are fellow members of SCYA and close friends of most individuals. Everyone had their booze and created a very lively atmosphere in the exhibition space. Not only that, many of them had voluntarily brought food such as a plate of lovely home made sandwiches and booze for the night, which we are very grateful for! All of us indulged into personal conversations, mostly discussing about art and their lives.

20130329_192321Guests receiving our catalogue at the reception table 

IMG_7654The early birds

IMG_7653A guest appreciating Safrie’s work. 

20130329_193247Visitors apprieciating Homa Shojaie’s works. 

SandwichLovely home made sandwiches

By 8p.m, our emcee, Daryl, lead the introduction of the exhibition and commenced the performance of Jacquelyn and Li.

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As they performed, majority of the audience was confused and took a while to try to understand their performance. At the end, Jacquelyn and Li explained their piece to everyone and this had made the audience ponder deeply about how society communicates in this current age. Their performance was about the lack of physical communication between people, and how sometimes it is because of this reason that it becomes difficult to communicate with people, especially when there is an misunderstanding. This often leads to a “jam” in their communication with each other. Here are some photos of their performance:

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 After, everyone gave praises and their critics to Jacquelyn and Li Cassidy. Then, continued with their conversations with their friends while some left for home.

Personally, my favorite art work from this exhibition was Benedict Chen’s piece. At first, the neat composition of his pictures and the focus of his subjects had caught my attention, but the write up for his piece was what made it my favorite. (Photo of woman looking at Ben’s photo) However his art work was in reference to one of Daryl Goh’s write up, which I found very inspiring:

“Today’s age in communication, creates and deconstructs barriers in between people, time and place. How we relate to one another is being filtered through pixels, information and the reliability of technology. Just like a glass in between us, its reflections and clarity amalgamate into one. It complicates our perception of sight but all the more I find it intriguing.” 

20130329_193228A guest appreciating Benedict Chen’s work.

I find it  very applicable to the realities of our society, especially in the way we communicate. I feel that it is a truth that sometimes we misunderstand each other when we communicate online, because we may sometimes misunderstand an individual’s tone, which often makes us confused or even stir negative emotions. This usually create meaningless conflicts or arguments online. One may even develop another personality when they’re online, since we can conceal ourselves as much as we want, gain more friends with a false smokescreen of ourselves. We often gain the courage online to offend or inappropriate statements because we need not make any eye contacts, but rather just a bunch of text on a screen. We think that we have nothing to lose. Although technology has definitely benefited the society today in many different aspects, this only makes people in the modern society to lose it’s ability to read people and not being able to make hold a proper conversation, let alone create one in person. We become dependent on a hope that someone else would start a conversation, when in reality that everyone is slowly turning the same way as we are.

There are other art works that was very thought provoking for me, and how I feel about it is pretty much the same as Benedict Chen’s work. After all, this exhibition is all the way we communicate in physical dialogue between people.

Here are some of the works that had inspired me:

Screen shot 2013-04-04 at PM 02.31.51Jacquelyn Soo, Tongue-tied

Screen shot 2013-04-04 at PM 02.31.41Homa Shojaie, Skype Portraits (1 our of 4 pieces shown)

Screen shot 2013-04-04 at PM 02.31.19Deusa Blumke, Bonding Time

If you haven’t seen out exhibition yet, do head down to The Reading Room at Tanjong Pagar, between 10a.m to 6p.m on Weekdays to view more awesome works. The exhibition will be held till the 29th April! For enquiries, you may email us at scya@contemporaryart.sg

Have a great day ahead everyone!

About scyablog

Singapore Contemporary Young Artists Project (SCYA) is a non-profit Art Society that highlights Contemporary Art by Young Artists in Singapore through several platforms in exhibitions, websites, talks, workshops & commissioned services. SCYA was initiated by Jacquelyn Soo who is an artist, curator and director for SCYA. SCYA has over 10 members in the society contributing ideas, activities to support the organisation. SCYA represents up to 70 Singaporean/PR Artists in their works. SCYA launched their first project in Nov 2008 with a website collaboration with FIVEFOOTWAY that featured 23 Contemporary Young Artists Portfolios on an interactive website. Since then, SCYA have had several collaborations and events organised with corporations, government institutions, NGOS and education institutions, Please visit our website for more details: www.contemporaryart.sg Like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/SingaporeContemporaryYoungArtists Thank you!

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This entry was posted on April 6, 2013 by in Others.

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